Why Wouldn't You Want This 2006 Maserati MC12 GT1 Car?

This rare 2006 Maserati MC12 GT1 will be up for auction in London next month, and it comes with a cracking racing history

Remind me later
Maserati - Why Wouldn't You Want This 2006 Maserati MC12 GT1 Car? - Used Cars

Think ‘Maserati’ and the sleek, elegant lines of a Quattroporte might come to mind. Or perhaps the GranTurismo model, which refined the best parts of a coupe and provided a more spacious and luxurious rival for the BMW 6-series. Maserati has cracked the code for style, comfort and elegance.

However, the company’s first car designed for daily use rather than racing was only produced in 1947 - before then, motorsport was the aim of the game. After this, though, the brand continued with its racing focus, winning the F1 World Championship title amongst other victories. In 1999, despite their previous rivalry on the track, Ferrari and Maserati merged and created the MC12 road-car, using the Ferrari Enzo chassis and engine as its core. The intention was to build a car which they could homologate for a racing variant, in order to take advantage of the new relaxed regulations of the 2004 FIA GT Championship.

Maserati - Why Wouldn't You Want This 2006 Maserati MC12 GT1 Car? - Used Cars

Only 50 of the original MC12 models were built, and it is still the fastest Maserati road car ever made. The rare GT1 variant is 250kg lighter than the street version, and was a huge triumph on track. It proved its capabilities by winning the FIA GT Championship for five consecutive years, from 2006 to 2010.

Maserati - Why Wouldn't You Want This 2006 Maserati MC12 GT1 Car? - Used Cars

The current owner of this example acquired the car in 2006 through being a loyal Ferrari customer and highly experienced competitive driver. The car entered the 2007 American Le Mans Series twice and made its debut in the Road America 500 in August, finishing third in its class and 14th overall. In early October it entered the Petit Le Mans at Road Atlanta where it came second overall in the GT1 class. Despite a crash after qualifying first in the class, the officials were happy that the car had completed a sufficient distance to finish.

The car has since been restored to its 2007 competition specifications and has been treasured in the owner’s private collection in Switzerland ever since. Complete with the authentic Petit Le Mans scrutineering sticker on its roll cage, the car comes with an extensive history file including the original purchase agreement and importation papers. It’s
believed that is one of only two MC12 GT1s which competed in the ALMS.

Maserati - Why Wouldn't You Want This 2006 Maserati MC12 GT1 Car? - Used Cars

As it stands, the car is also eligible to enter Masters Endurance Legends and Endurance Racing Legends events. So if you have a large sum of money burning a hole in your pocket and you fancy your chances of continuing the legacy of this car, this one is for you.

It’s set to be auctioned at an RM Sotheby’s event in London next month.