The BMW M2 CS Racing Is A Less Powerful, More Hardcore Version Of The Road Car

BMW's latest customer racing car is yours for €95,000 and available with different power outputs

Remind me later
BMW - The BMW M2 CS Racing Is A Less Powerful, More Hardcore Version Of The Road Car - Motorsport

While we may still be freaking out at BMW’s sensational new M2 CS, it’s important to note that another M car was revealed this week. As well as unveiling the mightiest M2 production car yet seen, Munich also spilt the beans on the MC CS Racing - a stripped-out customer motorsport machine.

As the full 444bhp output of the CS wouldn’t work with many of the suitable championships out there, the Racing is quite a bit less powerful than the road car. Exactly how much it produces depends on Balance of Performance rules in your chosen category, or what kind of permit you have (A or B) for VLN racing at the Nordschleife.

As standard, the 3.0-litre twin-turbo straight-six will produce 276bhp, but up to 360bhp can be unlocked via a ‘power key’. There are also plans afoot to offer an upgrade pack to give the same power figure as the road version.

BMW - The BMW M2 CS Racing Is A Less Powerful, More Hardcore Version Of The Road Car - Motorsport

The seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox has been retained, but it has race-specific software here. ABS and traction control haven’t been removed either, but again, a more motorsport-friendly calibration has been applied.

The electronically-controlled M Differential has been replaced with a mechanical LSD, while the adaptive dampers are switched for manually adjustable racing shocks from ZF Sachs. The wheels are slightly smaller than the road car’s at 18 inches in diameter, and they’re shod in Michelin slicks.

BMW - The BMW M2 CS Racing Is A Less Powerful, More Hardcore Version Of The Road Car - Motorsport

The standard body is largely retained, although there is a new adjustable rear wing plus a new front splitter. The rear side windows are made of ‘Makrolon’ polycarbonate, and on one side there’s an integrated filler neck for the 84-litre motorsport-grade fuel tank.

An air jack system is fitted as standard, and if you want, there’s a ruddy-great light on the options list, intended for 24-hour races. In addition, there’ll be a 120-litre endurance-racing fuel tank available towards the end of next year.

The price for all this? Perhaps less than you’d think - at €95,000, it’s exactly the same price as the road car in Germany, before VAT is added at least. So which would it be for you?