Dear Gran Turismo Generation, we got what we asked for, but was it worth it?

Dear Gran Turismo Generation, we got what we asked for, but was it worth it? - Japanese

Many of us from the 90s grew up playing Gran Turismo. The game is one of the main influences for our love for cars, more specifically the Japanese legends like the GTR, Supra, NSX, and RX7. Many of us know that the cars we idolize are old and outdated by now. When all hope seemed lost for the names of these cars to return, the big companies recently announced the revivals of their monsters. However, some of us are disappointed at the fact that the successors to our idol cars are technologically advanced and fitted with too many computers that it give us the idea that they no longer engage the driver. Let’s take a step back and understand that our idol cars were technologically advanced for their time and that they were more than likely perceived as less driver engaging to many traditionalist when they first came out. Specific advancements were the introduction of turbo chargers, 4 wheel steering, computerized 4wd, ABS etc. The cars we have today are advanced, but they are just as much as a progression as their predecessors were. Despite being from different generations, they all have the same objective to be the fastest on the tracks and serve as daily drivers for consumers.

Tuners Will Be Tuners

Dear Gran Turismo Generation, we got what we asked for, but was it worth it? - Japanese

It doesn’t matter how much the technology advances, people will continue to modify and tune the vehicles far beyond what the companies intend them for. A perfect example would be the Midnight Club Racing Team. They built cars that perform up to today’s sports car standards and some of them can probably outperform some super cars of today. These cars were the most advanced cars bone stock at the time, but their owners took them to the next level. The cars raced at tops speed near or above 200mph for long duration without sacrificing reliability and control. The new cars we have today still serve as a canvas to modify with the benefit of having strong platforms from the start.

Videogame Handling

Dear Gran Turismo Generation, we got what we asked for, but was it worth it? - Japanese

The car’s handling may feel like a video game, but that’s what the strive for handling perfection is. No under steer or over steer, just glued to the road where the car acts the way the driver thinks. That’s what most of us tune suspension and other handling characteristics for. Now we have the access to near perfect handling, but some of us reject it for it’s characteristic of being too perfect.

Did We Ask For Too Much?

Dear Gran Turismo Generation, we got what we asked for, but was it worth it? - Japanese

We wanted the legendary Japanese cars to return with modern performance. Companies responded to demand by creating what we have today, yet some people are disappointed because of how much they have changed. Keep in mind that we aren’t in the 90s anymore. In all honesty, it doesn’t matter if a driver pilots a manual, semi-manual, or automatic. If a driver is slow, they’re slow. For example, many professional race cars (mostly for time attacks) use clutchless sequential shifters that give them the ability to do “machine gun” shifting for fast paced performance. Now we have dual clutch transmissions that have similar affect for performance driving.