Matt Kimberley profile picture Matt Kimberley 6 years ago
News

Shelby GT350 Mustang Owners Sue Ford Over Track-Day Overheating

Ford enthusiasts in America have reported numerous cases of track-day overheating, and now a law firm is taking their complaints straight to Ford

Remind me later
Ford - Shelby GT350 Mustang Owners Sue Ford Over Track-Day Overheating - News

Shelby GT350 Mustang owners have filed a class-action lawsuit in America over accusations that the cars don’t live up to their ‘track-ready’ marketing.

Owners of the special high-performance model have joined together to complain about what they say is rapid overheating of the transmissions and rear differentials when the cars are used on track.

The cars are said to suddenly revert to a ‘limp mode’ with massive loss of power and speed. On a track, that sort of thing could cause accidents. Some owners are even saying it happens in as little as 15 minutes. Clearly, going limp so quickly is going to please no one.

Ford - Shelby GT350 Mustang Owners Sue Ford Over Track-Day Overheating - News

The legal challenge centres on Ford’s use of the phrase ‘track-ready’ in its marketing, arguing that if the GT350 overheats on track, it’s not really track-ready at all. Apparently it affects base models and those with the Technology Pack.

Lawyers are now saying that the cars are useless on track, and are extending their hands to Ford for compensation on behalf of the owners affected. The suit wants ‘monetary damages’ both for legal owners and those who only leased the car.

Law firm Hagens Berman has taken the case. Managing Partner, Steve Berman, presumably while gleefully rubbing his hands together at what could be a huge payday for the firm, said:

“When Ford marketed and sold these Shelby GT350 Mustangs, it knew exactly how to appeal to track-enthusiasts: it marketed enhanced performance in a limited-edition iconic vehicle that has been associated with racing for generations.”

“We believe that Ford induced purchasers with its ‘track-ready’ marketing, when in fact it knew that this defect would ultimately bar these Mustangs from ever being the hotrod consumers paid for.”

The complaint itself also adds that Ford’s refusal, so far, to offer a fix at no cost to the owner or keeper, is against the terms of the cars’ warranties. If lawyers can pull it off anywhere, it’s the US. Let’s see where this goes.