Matt Robinson profile picture Matt Robinson 6 years ago 8
News

The Ferrari FF Is Dead: Say Hello To The New GTC4Lusso

Maranello has updated its four-seater, four-wheel drive shooting brake, and given it a new name

Remind me later
Ferrari - The Ferrari FF Is Dead: Say Hello To The New GTC4Lusso  - News

Given that it’s a shooting brake, is all-wheel drive and can carry four actual, full-sized human beings, the FF is arguably the most intriguing thing Ferrari makes. And now, it’s even better. It’s received a whole host of changes, and Ferrari has even gone so far as to give the thing a new name: no longer is it the FF, it’s now the GTC4Lusso.

Ferrari - The Ferrari FF Is Dead: Say Hello To The New GTC4Lusso  - News

So, it’s a clumsy name that - like the F12berlinetta - makes you wonder if the bloke who sorts out model names at Ferrari has a broken space bar, but fortunately the restyle is anything but clumsy. We usually like to poke fun at the blink and you’ll miss it facelifts manufacturers seem to favour these days, but in the case of the GTC4, the nip and tuck it’s received is actually quite a significant one. And the changes are for the better, we reckon: check out the comparison photos above and below, where you’ll see the outgoing FF on the left.

Ferrari - The Ferrari FF Is Dead: Say Hello To The New GTC4Lusso  - News

As well as being aesthetically pleasing, the restyle brings with it a drag coefficient which is “substantially lower than on the FF.” You also get more power; the 6.2-litre V12 has been cranked up to 680bhp at 8000rpm with 514lb ft of torque at 5750rpm, up from 651bhp and 504lb ft.

The dry weight figure of 1790kg is no different to the FF, but the extra power is enough to slice 0.3sec off the FF’s 0-62mph figure - you’ll now be able to dispatch the benchmark sprint in 3.4 seconds. Top speed is - as on the FF - 208mph.

Ferrari - The Ferrari FF Is Dead: Say Hello To The New GTC4Lusso  - News

The leather-festooned interior gains a new infotainment system based around a 10.25-inch touchscreen, but the most interesting change from the FF is the one you can’t see. Under the skin, Ferrari has fitted its ‘4RM-S’ four-wheel steering system, something you’ll also find on the bonkers F12 TDF.

Can’t quite stump up the anticipated £230,000 or so price tag (the FF was £226,023)? You could just settle for having a good gawp at it in the metal - which you’ll be able to do at next month’s Geneva Motor Show.