Matt Robinson profile picture Matt Robinson a month ago 14
News

The 700bhp De Tomaso P72 Will Have A Roush-Tuned Mustang V8 Heart

The reborn Italian brand has confirmed it'll stick to De Tomaso tradition by using a Ford V8 for propulsion

Remind me later
De Tomaso - The 700bhp De Tomaso P72 Will Have A Roush-Tuned Mustang V8 Heart - News

The old De Tomaso Pantera had a simple setup. Chassis and styling by Italy, married to V8 power from America. The company’s longest-running, biggest selling car was propelled by a Ford Windsor V8, picking up where the also Blue Oval-powered Mangusta left off.

This tradition is set to continue - the recently re-born brand’s new P72 supercar uses a mid-mounted Ford Coyote V8, it’s been confirmed. But it won’t be quite the same as the mill used in the Mustang - this one’s been played around with by Roush.

De Tomaso - The 700bhp De Tomaso P72 Will Have A Roush-Tuned Mustang V8 Heart - News

It’s supercharged, giving a power output of “around” 700bhp plus a torque figure in excess of 600lb ft. The redline will be over 7500rpm. DeTomaso says that we can expect: “A world-class engine that provides a unique soundtrack reminiscent of the days of old”.

Flying in the face of the supercar world’s near-universal adoption of automatic gearboxes, the P72 will be available with only one transmission option: a six-speed manual. It’ll be a joyous thing to use too, thanks to the gorgeous exposed linkage (above).

The resurrection of DeTomaso is all thanks to a Hong Kong-based concern called IdealVenture, which also backs Apollo Automobil. This makes it possible for the P72 to sit on the same LMP-like structure as the mad Intensa Emozione. The P72 will have a much greater focus on luxury than its angular track-only cousin, however. The cabin is a sea of beautiful quilted leather, while on the outside, you’re treated to swooping, classy styling inspired by the P70 of the 1960s.

De Tomaso - The 700bhp De Tomaso P72 Will Have A Roush-Tuned Mustang V8 Heart - News

The P70 was part of a collaboration between Alejandro De Tomaso, Carroll Shelby and Peter Brock, but the project wasn’t to be - only one car of a planned run of 50 was ever made. Will the P72 be more of a success? We’ll have to wait and see - the last time someone tried to resurrect De Tomaso (2012) it ended in liquidation.

The early signs on this occasion are good, however. There’s no outlandish business plan involving multiple models, and the car is using a proven platform with an engine from just about the most major supplier possible.

We can’t wait to hear that “unique soundtrack”.